Shopping in Kyoto

Posted on February 20, 2013 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

My last Kyoto blog entry is on shopping...

Since I spent much of the time in the rural area exploring temples and gardens, there was barely time for shopping. The day before I left for Tokyo, I went into the city centre during the late afternoon and spent a few hours exploring the shopping district.

 

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Traditional shops selling local crafts and souvenir on Saga-Toriimoto preserved street

 

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Kitsch-style shop and geisha-themed stationery

 

Food

Nishiki Market, known as as "Kyoto's Kitchen", has been trading since 1310 is a must for foodies. There are fresh seafood, vegetables, dried and pickled food, knives and cookware etc. The market is one of the cleanest markets I have been to, unfortunately, I arrived quite late and many stores were closing, otherwise, I could spend hours here...

 

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Nishiki market

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Beautiful food packaging and different types of Kit Kat including matcha flavour & a Kyoto edition

 

Stationery & paper crafts

As a city known for its strong heritage and traditional arts and crafts, it would be a waste not to visit the stationery or paper crafts shops while I was there. However, these shops are scattered in different parts of the city and due to the limited time, I was only able to visit a few of them within the same district. It is essential to do a bit of planning beforehand as some of them are not easy to find, but shops tend to open until 7.30 or 8pm, so I was able to do some last minute shopping.

 

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Traditional stationery shops can still be seen in the city centre

 

Suzuki Shofudo - this 115-year old paper craft shop not only sells colourful and graphical washi paper and stationery, it also provides paper-making workshops at its premise. If time is limited, this shop is a good place to visit if you are looking for stationery with a traditional touch. I also love the shop's "frog" identity, it's just too cute ( see below)...

Not far from the shop is Rokkaku, a more contemporary paper shop that designs and prints customised invitations and cards, but it also sells greeting cards and letter sets. Many of the cards are letterpressed, they are simple and yet elegant and come with very nice envelopes.

 

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Main, middle left & middle: Suzuki Shofudo. Middle right & bottom: Rokkaku

 

Benrido - I stumbled upon this stationery shop when I last visited Kyoto and I could still remember my excitement when I stepped into the shop. I love the art-inspired stationery and postcards. I have this odd passion for plastic folders and I have a few of them in A4 and A5 sizes. I find them particularly useful when I travel, but it's only in Japan where I can find different graphical patterns. Here, the shop has a variety of plastic folders with traditional and contemporary motifs and patterns, which made me very happy. This shop is also a great place to find traditional-inspired stationery for friends back home.

 

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Benrido

 

Uragu - this tiny paper shop hidden in an alleyway was surprisingly busy when I visited. It was not an easy find, but the traffic police knew the shop as soon as I showed him the address. There are beautiful greeting cards, postcards, letter sets and notebooks neatly displayed on dark wooden shelves here. The prices are not cheap but the items are one of a kind and are hard to find elsewhere.

 

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Design

Opposite Benrido is the Kyoto design house, located on the ground floor of the Nikawa Building, designed by architect Tadao Ando. There are many beautiful design items on sale here from contemporary to more classic designs that showcase Japanese traditional craftsmanship.

 

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Kyoto design house

 

Fashion

Although I love new and cool designs, I also love traditional designs that beautifully crafted by hand. And in Kyoto, I was constantly drawn by various hair combs and pins behind the glass displays while walking down the streets. Besides hair accessories, graphical tenugui ( a traditional cotton towel or cloth) and tabi socks can also be seen in many shops here.

 

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Traditional fashion accessories

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Main: sushi-inspired accessories; Bottom left: tabi socks; Bottom right: tenugui bags

 

From its cool shop display, it would be hard to imagine that Raak has been around since 1534. It specialises in tengunui, which can be used as a scarf, wine bottle wrapper and even bags. There are many colourful graphical patterns available and are mostly seasonal, a visit to the shop will make you realise how creative one can be with just a piece of cloth.

 

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Raak

 

SOU SOU is the Japanese equivalent of Marimekko and is one of my favourite Japanese fashion brands, originally from Kyoto. I bought a pair of canvas shoes from their Tokyo shop a few years ago and I think they are cooler than Converse. In Kyoto, their main shop occupies three floors selling tabi socks, shoes, bags and their collaboration with Le coq sportif. Opposite the building, there is a womenswear shop, a menswear shop further down, as well as a few shops specialising in childrenswear, soft furnishing and textiles nearby. I love their bold graphical prints and their merge of traditional craftsmanship, techniques with modern designs. As far as I know, most items are made in Japan, so the quality is ensured.

 

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 SOU SOU

 

Beauty

When in Kyoto, it will be hard to miss Yojiya's brand identity... a simple black and white sketch of a woman's face. Founded in 1904, this cult beauty shop is famous for its "Aburatorigami" (Oil blotting Facial Paper), which is particularly useful in summers. There are several shops located in the city but my favourite is the one on Philosophy path, which has a shop and a tea house next door.

 

Yojiya green tea perfume

Yojiya's window display and green tea solid perfume made and sold at Taizo-in

 


This post was posted in Japanese designs, Stationery, Shopping, Shopping guide, Fashion, Travel, Japanese stationery, Anything Japanese, Kyoto, Design, Visual merchandising and was tagged with Japanese designs, stationery, shopping, fashion, Kyoto, visual merchandising

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