The Mills (Part 2): Art, design & retail

Posted on May 28, 2019 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

the mill tseun wan

 

One of The Mill's main attractions is CHAT (Centre for Heritage, Arts and Textile) – a space dedicated to the past, current, and future of Hong Kong and Asia’s textile industry.

Welcome to the Spinning Factory! is the inaugural exhibition designed by Turner Prize winning U.K. architect collective Assemble and UK/HK design firm HATO. Set within the former cotton spinning mills of Nan Fung Textiles in Tsuen Wan, the exhibition tells the story of the cotton industry and the role it played in shaping Hong Kong’s past, present and future. The interactive exhibition features old machinery, vintage cotton products and archival documents and objects. Visitors can also experience the manual cotton-spinning process using traditional spinning instruments, and design and create cotton labels at the workshop stations.

 

the mill tseun wan

the mill tseun wan

the mill tseun wan

the mill tseun wan

The mill

the mill tseun wan

the mill tseun wan

the mill tseun wan

the mill tseun wan

'Welcome to the Spinning Factory!' exhibition at the The D. H. Chen Foundation Gallery

 

An interesting piece of artwork caught my eye outside of the gallery and it was a long piece of knitted textile on a table titied Fabric of CHAT. It was the work by Hong Kong-based artist/designer Movana Chen. Movana is known for her KNITerature, which combines stories by knitting books from people she encounters during her travels. When she first visited the construction site of The Mills, she discovered stacks of old discarded documents, so she shredded and knitted them into a new art form that contains the history and memories of the factory.

 

Fabric of Chat

  Fabric of ChatFabric of Chat

Fabric of CHAT by Movana Chen

 

CHAT’s inaugural exhibition, Unfolding : Fabric of Our Life, curated by Takahashi Mizuki showcases the works and performances by 17 contemporary Asian artists and collectives who use textile as a testimony to articulate forgotten histories and repressed lives through textile production. The thought-provoking exhibition reveals the region’s colonial capitalist exploitation through the use of fabrics and garments. One work that I found quite powerful is called 'Day Off Mo?' by Filipino artist Alma Quinto, who invited Hong Kong's Filipino domestic workers to speak out about their experiences through a video and their DIY craft book.

 

Dayanita Singh's 'Time measures', 2016

Dayanita Singh's 'Time measures', 2016

Dayanita Singh's 'Time measures', 2016

 

Norberto Roldan's 'Incantations in the land of virgins, monsters, sorcerers and angry gods', 1999 - 2018

Norberto Roldan's 'Incantations in the land of virgins, monsters, sorcerers and angry gods', 1999 - 2018

Norberto Roldan's 'Incantations in the land of virgins, monsters, sorcerers and angry gods', 1999 - 2018

 

Jakkai Siributr

Jakkai Siributr

Jakkai Siributr's Fast fashion, 2015/19

 

Reza Afisina, Under Construction as Long as You’re Not Paying Attention, 2018–19

Reza Afisina's 'Under Construction as Long as You’re Not Paying Attention', 2018–19

 

Alma Quinto's 'Day Off Mo?', 2018–19

Alma Quinto, Day Off Mo?, 2018–19

Alma Quinto's 'Day Off Mo?', 2018–19

 

the mill tseun wan  the mill tseun wan

 

I was also intrigued by Vietnamese artist Vo Tran Chau's 'Leaf picking in the ancient forest', 2018-2019. The name of the artwork is inspired by the title of a monk’s manuscript. Buddha, taking a few leaves in his hand, said to the monks: “All that I have seen and encountered are numerous, just like leaves among the grove, yet my teachings which I have revealed to you are but little, just like this handful of leaves in my palm…”.

The artist collected abandoned clothing from second-hand clothing stores to create her abstract mosaic chamber. Each quilted mosaic references historical photographs of Vietnamese textile factories and reflects the distinct cultural and political climates of North, Central and South Vietnam at different periods of time. The quilts reflect only blurred images as if a metaphor for the fate of the textile factories. Inside the chamber, one sees another side/story in these historical images.

 

Vo Tran Chau's Leaf picking in the ancient forest, 2018-2019

Vo Tran Chau's Leaf picking in the ancient forest, 2018-2019

Vo Tran Chau's Leaf picking in the ancient forest, 2018-2019

 

One encouraging aspect of The Mills is that the retail outlets here differ vastly from other shopping malls in Hong Kong. Instead of international chained companies, the shops here are mostly independent and with a strong focus on sustainability.

I was glad to see that Book B (which we have worked with previously) has found a new home here. The space is inviting and it also has a nice cafe inside. I think this is one of the best independent book shops in Hong Kong, and I hope it will continue to thrive.

 

KoKo Coffee Roasters

KoKo Coffee Roasters

KoKo Coffee Roasters

 

book b the mill tseun wan

book b the mill tseun wan

book b the mill tseun wan

Book B

 

Another surprise was to see a garment upcycling shop called Alt:, which is a partnership between HKRITA (The Hong Kong Research Institute of Textiles and Apparel) and Novetex (a leading textile firm), together with funding from HKSAR government, H&M foundation and The Mills.

A garment-to-Garment (G2G) Recycle System is placed in the shop for the public to learn how old clothes can be upcycled and made into a new ready-made garment in 4 hours, with the aid of the innovation of upcycling technology. The on-site mill can upcycle up to 3 tons of textile waste per day, which hopfully will help to tackle the city's fashion waste issue.

 

Alt:

Alt:

Alt:

Alt: – the upcycling garment shop that can turn your unwanted clothing into something new

 

 the mill tseun wan

 the mill tseun wan

 the mill tseun wan

 the mill tseun wan

the mill

 

Overall, I enjoyed my visit to The Mills; I think it offer an alternative retail experience (which is much needed in Hong Kong), and the new textile centre is an exciting cultural space that showcases Hong Kong's textile heritage while looking forward to the future.

 

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This post was posted in Coffee, Hong Kong, Exhibitions, Architecture, Shopping, Art, Contemporary craft, Hong Kong design, Architectural conservation, Design, Asian art, books, Textiles, upcycled design and was tagged with Coffee, Hong Kong, art and design exhibitions, architecture, shopping, Hong Kong design, heritage, contemporary crafts, Architectural conservation, Asian art, bookshops, textiles

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