Serpentine pavilion & Summer Houses 2016

Posted on July 26, 2016 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

Serpentine Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

Serpentine Pavilion by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG)

 

This year, the 16th Serpentine Pavilion (10th Jun until 9th Oct 2016) is designed by Danish architectural studio BIG, or Bjarke Ingels Group. In addition to the main pavilion, four 25sqm summer houses inspired by the nearby 18th century Queen Caroline’s Temple are commissioned and built by architects who have yet to build a permanent building in England.

 

serpentine gallery 2016

serpentine gallery 2016

serpentine gallery 2016  serpentine gallery 2016

 

From afar, the towering pavilion looks less striking than some of the previous ones. Yet it becomes more intriguing as you get closer... when you realise that the structure is made up of stacked rectangular fibreglass boxes. The 'unzipped wall' creates a cave-like canyon, and it is fascinating when you look up inside the structure. It somehow reminds me of Muji's transparent stackable storage units!

 

Barkow Leibinger summer house

Barkow Leibinger summer house

Barkow Leibinger summer house

Summer house designed by Barkow Leibinger

 

Like the main pavilion, the four temporary summer houses around English landscape architect William Kent's Queen Caroline’s Temple are also available sale, but at lower costs of £95,000 or £125,000.

American/German architectural practice Barkow Leibinger's summerhouse is inspired by William Kent's other 18th century pavilion that once stood in the park, but is no longer standing. The small pavilion rotated mechanically 360 degrees at the top of the hill, offering various panoramic views of the park. Here, the architects created a curvy structure based on the idea of coiling material in your hands then stacking the coils upon each other.

 

Kunlé Adeyemi summer house

Kunlé Adeyemi summer house

Kunlé Adeyemi summer house

Summer house designed by Kunlé Adeyemi

 

Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi designed an inverse replica of the Queen Caroline's Temple directly opposite it. The structure is made of prefabricated building blocks assembled from rough sandstone similar to those used in the temple. Its clever deconstructed design offers visitors a space for shelter and relaxation.

 

summer houses 2016

Asif Khan summer house

Asif Khan summer house  Yona Friedman summer house

Yona Friedman summer house

Yona Friedman summer house

Yona Friedman summer house

Top to 3rd row left: Summer house designed by Asif Khan; 3rd row right & bottom three rows: Summer house designed by Yona Friedman

 

The third house is designed by British architect Asif Khan, whose structure traces back to Kent's original idea 300 years ago: to catch sunlight reflected off the nearby Serpentine lake annually on Queen Caroline's birthday. Khan's new design comprises 100 white timber staves, white gravels, and a polished metal platform and roof in the middle. Conceived as a Tea House, visitors can sit inside and enjoy sunlight and the surrounding scenery.

The fourth house – and my favourite – is design by the 93 year-old Hungarian-born French architect Yona Friedman. The architect is best known for his theory of mobile architecture that started in the 1950s. His house is inspired by his project La Ville Spatiale (Spatial City) in 1959, which was based on two principles: firstly, a mobile architecture that could create an elevated city space and enable the growth of cities while restraining the use of land; secondly, the use of modular structures to allow people to live in housing of their own design.

Here, the modular structure composed of cubes can be assembled and disassembled in different formations. It also acts as a movable museum and exhibition space, where part of the cubes can support transparent polycarbonate panels and showcase different artworks or objects. I love this structure for its tribal-inspired concept and simplicity, and I find the geometric shapes very enticing especially against the blue sky.

 

Elytra filament pavilion

Elytra filament pavilion

Elytra filament pavilion  Elytra filament pavilion

Elytra filament pavilion at the V & A museum

 

Nearby at the V & A Museum, a newly-commissioned outdoor installation, Elytra Filament Pavilion (until 6 November) is created by architects (Achim Menges and Moritz Dörstelmann) and engineers (Jan Knippers and Thomas Auer) at the research institutes of University of Stuttgart.

The design is inspired by the lightweight construction principles found in nature, the filament structures of the forewing shells of flying beetles known as elytra. Made of glass and carbon fibre, each component of the undulating canopy is produced using an innovative robotic winding technique developed by the designers. The 'growing' shelter collects data on how visitors inhabit the pavilion and monitors the structure’s behaviour while it is on display. This is another marvelous pavilion that is not to be missed!

 

 

 


This post was posted in London, Architecture, Gardens & parks, Design, Contemporary and was tagged with London, gardens, serpentine pavilion, contemporary architecture, V & A museum

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