Maze Hill Pottery's open studio

Posted on December 12, 2015 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

Maze Hill pottery  Maze Hill pottery

Top left: The disused ticket office-turned pottery studio; Top right: Lisa Hammond's beautiful Soda & Shino glaze pottery

 

London is full of hidden gems, not only they are off tourists' radar, but many are also unknown to Londoners. Since I live north of the river, I am quite oblivious to events that take place beyond Bermondsey or the Design Museum. We Londoners rarely venture out of our comfort zones (i.e. the zones we live or work in), thus we are like tourists when we step into the unknown!

It was an invitation that brought me to Maze Hill Pottery's open studio in Greenwich. The 2-day annual open studio event provided a rare opportunity for visitors to purchase beautiful handmade pottery by renowned pottery artist Lisa Hammond and her apprentices at significantly reduced prices.

 

Maze Hill pottery

Maze Hill pottery  Maze Hill pottery

Top: Darren Ellis' pottery; Bottom left: Lisa Hammond's Shino chawan tea bowl and sake bottles; Bottom right: The outdoor workshop area

 

The studio is situated in the former ticket office of Maze Hill Station, which opened in 1873. Lisa turned the disused office into a pottery studio in the mid 1990s and built the first soda glaze trolley kiln in the UK at the back of the studio.

The studio also offers pottery workshops and evening courses, where students can learn the techniques of studio pottery in a professional working studio environment.

 

Maze Hill pottery

Maze Hill pottery  Maze Hill pottery

 

I wonder if BBC's "The Great Pottery Throw Down" (the pottery version of the hugely popular TV show "The Great British Bake off") has triggered the public's interests in pottery?

Regardless of the TV show, the studio's reputation and exquisite pottery pieces have gained support from locals over the years, and so all the best bargains were snapped up as soon as the kiln was opened in the morning! Luckily, I did manage to pick up noodle bowls and mug reduced to prices cheaper than the mass manufactured pieces from Habitat!

After some mulled wine and snacks, I left the studio feeling satisfied with my purchase, and the fact that I have supported a local pottery studio. London doesn't need more chained stores run by big corporations, we need more independent stores and studios run by passionate artisans, craftsmen, designers, bakers, booksellers and even corner shop owners who truly want to make a difference in this city.


This post was posted in London, Coffee, Shopping, British designs, Korean stationery, Trade fairs, Calligraphy, Traditional arts & crafts, Britain, Design, Portuguese art, ceramics & potteries and was tagged with London, British design, ceramics & potteries

Comments