100% design 2015

Posted on October 2, 2015 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

100% design 2015 donar at 100% design 2015

100% design's new venue in Olympia; right: Donar

 

Having visited The London design festival for many years, I somehow feel that the festival is losing its spark/edge. The guide is undoubtedly getting thicker and heavier (not sure if anyone enjoyed carrying this design festival 'bible' around for 10 days), yet the festival itself has become more 'business' like.

This may sound mean but as far as I can remember, this year's design trade shows were by far the least inspiring. Since when did design become so boring and safe?! Although 100% design moved from Earls Court to Olympia this year, the vast venue was unexpectedly quiet during my visit.

 

soso studio at 100% design 2015 soso studio soso studio hi design shanghaiey productssoso studio

1st, 2nd and bottom right: Soso Studio; Bottom left: Hi design Shanghai; Bottom middle: E-Y products

 

At the entrance of the show, one couldn't help but notice the conspicuous booths from China. One of them was Icon's Hi Design Shanghai, which featured ten Chinese emerging and established design brands for the first time in UK. It is interesting to see how Chinese designs have evolved in a short period of time; and although the Chinese design scene is still immature, many young Chinese designers are developing their own styles and utilising traditional skills and craftsmanship that have been passed down for centuries.

 

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Although I was disappointed with the show and the products in general, I did benefit from the insightful talk on the future of design by trend forecasters and 3D researcher. As we have seen in recent years, sustainability, ethics and upcycling have become the predominant factors in design; and designers are now rethinking human's relationship with nature and consumerism. "How to make consumerism the answer rather than a thread?" is the question that designers have to deal with. It is almost ironic to talk about sustainability at these design trade shows because there are simply too many unnecessary products that are being made, and it is quite evident at these shows.

I left the show pondering how I, as a designer, e-tailer, consumer and citizen be more responsible of my actions; and at the same time make other consumers be more conscious of their behaviour. These changes cannot be made overnight, and they require collective power/movement. I believe that more collaborations and dialogues between different industries and sectors are necessary in order to create a global shift that focuses more on the quality of life than short term profits or economic gains.

 


This post was posted in London, Business, Talks, Trade fairs, Chinese design, Design festivals & shows, Contemporary craft, Design and was tagged with London, talks, Trade fair, chinese design, 100% design, London Design Festival

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