Good design award exhibition 2011

Posted on November 22, 2011 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

In Tokyo Midtown, I visited the Good design award exhibition 2011 exhibited this year's award-winning Japanese designs. My favourite was DoCoMo's ad for their Touchwood mobile phone, Xylophone of the Forest (click on the link to watch the amazing film). The campaign was cancelled because it launched on the day the tsunami hit Japan but the film was uploaded to Youtube and became a huge sucess. The film not only scooped the Good design award but also the Golden Lion at Cannes, a well-deserved winner.

Another winning design was created by one of my favourite Japanese stationery brands, D-Bros. They launched a new shop in Shinagawa and the 'Stamp it' range where customers can customize their own stationery. Love the concept and graphics!

If I didn't read the description, I wouldn't have a clue about what these spoons could do! (please excuse the rather dark photo) They are called 15.0% and are designed by Naoki Terada (the designer behind the 1/100 architectural model greeting cards sold by us!). They are made of aluminium and with its high thermal conductivity, the temperature of the hand holding the spoon will slowly melt the frozen ice cream. The spoons also come in different shapes for different flavours! Click here for more details.

At the atrium inside the Galleria, there was also a Hermès paper pavillion, designed by architects Shigeru Ban and Jean de Gastines. Shigeru Ban is a visionary well known for his paper architecture esp. for housing earthquake victims. It was particularly interesting to see Hermès presenting their newly launched home collection inside a pavillion made of cardboard tubes!

At Mitsukoshi in Ginza, there were many interesting shibori products on display including lighting and fashion accessories.

Click here/ go to my Facebook page to see more photos...


This post was posted in Japanese designs, Tokyo, Travel, Design festivals & shows, Anything Japanese, Design and was tagged with Tokyo, Japanese designs, art and design exhibitions, Tokyo design week

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