Burmese crafts: bamboo & textiles weaving

Posted on April 11, 2017 by Toothpicker There have been 0 comments

burmese bamboo weaving

Bamboo factory

 

Bamboo is a material that is widely available and used in Myanmar. The sustainable and versatile material is used to build houses, scaffolding, make woven walls, furniture and basketry etc.

We visited a bamboo factory in Mandalay, and it was interesting to see how the hollow and tall bamboo shoots can be transformed into thin strips to be woven into all kinds of products using quite primitive tools.

 

burmese bamboo weaving

burmese bamboo weaving

burmese bamboo weaving

burmese bamboo weaving

burmese bamboo weaving

Visiting a bamboo factory in Mandalay

 

burmese bamboo weaving

burmese bamboo weaving

Bamboo furniture, homeware, baskets and footballs are sold in the streets

 

bamboo house Burma

bamboo house Burma

bamboo toilet Burma  bamboo hut toilet Burma

1st & 2nd rows: A house made of bamboo; Last row: An eco toilet hut made of wood and bamboo

 

burmese brooms  burmese mat

burmese carpet

Top left: Brooms made of bamboo and grass; Top right and bottom: woven coloured mats

 

After the visit to the bamboo factory, we visited Thein Nyo silk weaving workshop in Amarapura. Since Amarapura is a former royal city, hence it has a long silk-weaving heritage. Patterned longyis, scarves, cushion covers, handbags and other textile goods are made and sold in the shop next to the workshop.

 

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory  burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

Thein Nyo silk weaving workshop in Amarapura

 

Around Inle Lake, the ancient craft of lotus weaving has survived and we were immensely fascinated by this unique material. We visited a workshop and watched the demonstration of how a weaver skillfully drew out thin and delicate lotus fibres from the cut stems. Amazing.

 

inle lake weaving factory

inle lake weaving factory

burmese weaving factory  burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory  burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

inle lake weaving factory

inle lake weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving factory  burmese weaving factory

Lotus and silk workshop around Inle Lake

 

Lotus is a plant notably related to Buddhism, thus the robes made of lotus were offered to Buddhist monks in the old days. Since this weaving technique is fairly time-consuming, most of the products on sale now are mixed with silk, making them more affordable than items made from pure lotus.

However, due to lack of government support and infrastructure, it is extremely difficult for these products to be exported out of Myanmar, and so they are sold mostly to tourists.

 

burmese weaving factory

burmese weaving

Padong tribal (long-neck) woman weaving around Inle Lake

 

burmese embroidery

burmese embroidery

Tapestry and embroidery workshop in Mandalay

 

During this trip, I was quite astonished by the variety of traditional arts and crafts that have been preserved in Myanmar. It is a shame that most of the beautifully crafted products are not available outside of Myanmar. Since Myanmar is changing rapidly, I hope that the traditional craft industry can survive and flourish one day like Thailand and Vietnam.

 

burmese lace weaving  burmese lace weaving

burmese lace weaving

Lace artisans and lace merchandise sold around Inle Lake

 


This post was posted in Traditional arts & crafts, Myanmar, weaving and was tagged with traditional crafts, Myanmar, Burmese craft, textiles, weaving, embroidery, bamboo

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